27 Habits That Produce 21st Century Teachers

Preface: There are typos in this infographic that, if our social media channels and the comments section are telling us anything, are driving many of your crazy. We get it. This infographic was not created by us, however, so we can’t edit it. If typos and grammar errors make you rage, click away now.

Most TeachThought readers know that one of your central themes is clarifying 21st century learning.

Like many of you, we find a lot of the discussion a bit tired (Innovate! Connect!!), but also important due to the variety of experience levels in education. While somewhere approaching 80% of our audience has taught 8 years or more, that means there’s another 20% that may be new to all of this, which make put a 2000 word manifesto on the topic a bit of overkill.

In that respect, we try to offer a little bit of something for everyone. Like infographics.

While we silently wonder if they’ve jumped the shark, they’re everywhere. So here we are. We’ve shared these graphics from Mia MacMeekin before, and this is another you might be interested in seeing: 27 Habits That Produce 21st Century Teachers

She calls it something else, but either way you slice it, it explores the same topic we’ve looked at before–and will look at again. What does it mean to be a “21st century teacher?” What makes this one valuable–in lieu of the handful of typos we found–is that it offers some fairly concrete strategies and actions that can help realize the (possibly cliche) idea of being a 21st century teacher.

morphing-into-21st-century-teacher

10 Comments

  • “how the student interpret’s” your lesson? Interpret’s? Really? Who owns the interpret? Or maybe the interpret is? Or perhaps that apostrophe just got lost somewhere and stopped by for a rest.

    Questions without question marks. Sentences without capital letters. Really?

    I know none of us are perfect, and I may not agree with everything listed here, and I might even think some of these points are a little trite, but in an infographic that I might want to share with teachers and students I expect the spelling and grammar to at least be correct.

    And don’t even get me started on the mishmash of font choices.

    • Chris–

      I agree. It’s not easy on the eyes. Almost didn’t post it because of that. (To clarify, we didn’t create it, only shared it as we thought some might find it useful.)

  • This was the post that finally drove me to unsubscribe. Your RSS teaser feed doesn’t give enough information, and when I click through, I’m finding more and more thin content like this. I’m sure if you start posting great stuff or providing full RSS feeds, I’ll hear about it someplace or another and resubscribe.

    • J–

      Thanks for the feedback.

      We’re working on another project now with another company that will require us to enable the full post to appear in the feed. Your feedback will help us expedite that process.

      In terms of the “thin” content, when we first launched TeachThought, we focused almost exclusively on long-from editorials and in-depth looks at learning trends and possibility, in addition to what we felt were under-served topics like the relationship between culture and learning.

      Through our analytics, teacher polls, and conversations like this, we’ve found that there are a wide variety of teachers out there in search of an equally wide variety of content. Accordingly, we try to fill that demand, with the admittedly “thin” stuff like lists of tools and infographics, in addition to our unique learning models, thought leadership, and analyses of learning.

      We take the quality of our content very seriously, while also leaving our ego at the door and trying to serve what educators ask for. It’s not always an easy line to walk, and we appreciate feedback–even if it’s in the form of you leaving as a reader–to help us understand where we’re doing well, and where we’re failing.

      Thanks again for letting us know, and best of luck to you in your good work as an educator.

    • J–

      Thanks for the feedback.

      We’re working on another project now with another company that will require us to enable the full post to appear in the feed. Your feedback will help us expedite that process.

      In terms of the “thin” content, when we first launched TeachThought, we focused almost exclusively on long-from editorials and in-depth looks at learning trends and possibility, in addition to what we felt were under-served topics like the relationship between culture and learning.

      Through our analytics, teacher polls, and conversations like this, we’ve found that there are a wide variety of teachers out there in search of an equally wide variety of content. Accordingly, we try to fill that demand, with the admittedly “thin” stuff like lists of tools and infographics, in addition to our unique learning models, thought leadership, and analyses of learning.

      We take the quality of our content very seriously, while also leaving our ego at the door and trying to serve what educators ask for. It’s not always an easy line to walk, and we appreciate feedback–even if it’s in the form of you leaving as a reader–to help us understand where we’re doing well, and where we’re failing.

      Thanks again for letting us know, and best of luck to you in your good work as an educator.

      • Wow, this is one of the best responses to criticism I’ve ever read on the internet! Professional, thoughtful, and directly addresses the reader’s concerns – nicely done!

  • Not sure why this is getting such negative comments. It’s actually an excellent list, even if the design isn’t all it might be. Shame more teachers don’t do more of these things.

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