Graphic: How Sleep Affects Student Performance In School

sleep-tips-fic

Graphic: How Sleep Affects Student Performance In School

Contributed by vistacollege.edu

How important is sleep to academic performance? Sleep researcher Ravi Allada puts it simply: “One of the most profound effects of a night of sleep is the improvement in our ability to remember things.” Reading, writing, and remembering are the foundation of formal learning, so it’s easy to see that if you have trouble remembering, understanding–and thus performance in school–will suffer.

And according to students, they’re not sleeping very well in college.

  • 11% claim to ‘sleep well’ (enjoy it now)
  • 20% of all college students pull at least one
  • 27% of college students are at risk for at least one sleep disorder.
  • 68% have trouble sleeping at night due to stress over academic concerns

In the graphic below, 5 tips for better ‘sleep performance’ in pursuit of performance in the classroom and higher GPAs are given, including limiting or avoiding caffeine, energy drinks, and blue light from electronic devices late at night. Naps are also recommended, in addition to exercise, and having a sleep routine to alert the body and mind that it’s time for rest.

Of course, sleep is much more than a matter of doing well in school. Sleep problems that begin during school years can persist for years, affecting physical health and emotional well-being. While GPA can be a product of sleep (and the reverse can be true–sleep can be a product of GPA), as “students” become professional, begin families, and are forced to ‘perform’ in a broader world beyond the classroom, being well-rested can be among the most important characteristics for long-term happiness and success.

Graphic: How Sleep Affects Student Performance In School

Sleep better, improve your learning experience

Image courtesy of: www.vistacollege.edu

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